The Cradle
US occupation forces convoy attacked in Iraq’s Basra province
The US convoy is the second one to be targeted by a bomb within the last 24 hours
By News Desk - December 27 2021
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A convoy of US vehicles seen after the withdrawal from northern Syria, on the outskirts of Dohuk, Iraq, 21 October, 2019. (Photo credit: REUTERS/Ari Jalal)

A convoy of military vehicles belonging to the US occupation was targeted by a roadside bomb in Iraq’s Basra province on 27 December.

According to a local media outlet, the convoy was carrying unspecified military equipment headed for Kuwait when it was attacked on the Al Diwaniyah–Basra highway.

The explosion reportedly caused significant damage to a number of vehicles in the convoy. It is not yet clear if there were any human casualties. No group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

The incident occurred a day after another US military convoy was attacked in the same region. The number of attacks targeting US military convoys and installations has increased in recent months.

The presence of US troops in Iraq is not popularly tolerated and most citizens consider it an occupation. The US government says the troops are in the country to help the government of Iraq in its fight against ISIS.

On 5 January 2020, the parliament of Iraq overwhelmingly passed a resolution demanding the departure of all US troops from the country. The resolution stated that “the government commits to revoke its request for assistance from the international coalition fighting Islamic State due to the end of military operations in Iraq and the achievement of victory.”

In July 2019, US President Joe Biden announced that Washington would withdraw all its troops from Iraq.

On 9 December, Qassem al-Araji, the national security advisor of Iraq issued a statement saying the combat mission of the US military had ended, but that the troops would stay in the country and act as trainers and advisors to the Iraqi army.

A number of stakeholders have rejected this move and say it is merely an attempt to justify the presence of US soldiers.

The US invaded Iraq in 2003 and deployed over 170,000 soldiers to the country to overthrow the Saddam Hussein government and purportedly to destroy his weapons of mass destruction.

No evidence of these weapons was ever found.