The Cradle
Moroccans march against normalization with Israel
Protesters demand their government break ties with Tel Aviv
By News Desk - November 30 2021
https://media.thecradle.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/MRC3.jpg

Thousands of people took to the streets of various cities and towns across Morocco on 29 November to protest against the deepening ties between Rabat and Tel Aviv.

The protests, organized by a coalition of activists under the banner of the “The Moroccan Front to Support Palestine and against Normalization,” drew large crowds in the cities of Oujda, Berkane, Ben Slimane, Beni-Mellal and Oulad Teima.  Heavily armed police officers violently repressed similar protests in the capital Rabat.

The protesters who chanted anti-Israeli slogans condemned their government’s increased collaboration with Tel Aviv.  They say it is unacceptable for any Arab country to normalize relations with Israel while it is still occupying Palestinian lands.

Anger has been simmering in Morocco since August 2020 when the country’s leaders joined other Arab nations led by the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain to normalize ties with Israel under the so-called Abraham Accords.

Former US president Donald Trump sealed the agreement in a phone call with Morocco’s King Mohammed VI. As part of the agreement, the US president agreed to recognize Morocco’s “sovereignty” over the Western Sahara region.

The signing of a military agreement between Rabat and Tel Aviv during the recent visit of Benjamin Gantz, the minister in charge of Israel’s military affairs, has sparked the current wave of protests. The newly signed agreement will, among other things, allow Morocco to purchase military weapons and drones from Israeli companies.

Palestinian resistance movements have also strongly condemned the military agreement between the two sides. Hamas described it as “unprecedented and disgraceful”  while the executive committee of the Palestinian Authority stressed that ”the agreement constitutes a departure from what was stipulated in the Arab League summits, the Arab consensus, and the Arab Peace Initiative.”