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Yemen and Saudi Arabia agree to extend ceasefire agreement: UN
Within the first month of the truce, Saudi-led coalition forces violated the agreement over 5,000 times
By News Desk - June 02 2022
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(Photo credit: AFP)

The UN has announced that Yemen and Saudi Arabia have agreed to renew a two-month truce on 2 June, the day the ceasefire was set to expire.

“I would like to announce that the parties to the conflict have agreed to the United Nations proposal to renew the current truce in Yemen for two additional months,” UN envoy to Yemen, Hans Grundberg, revealed.

Grundberg added that the truce extension would come into effect “when the current truce period expires, today, 2 June 2022 at 19:00 Yemen time (1600 GMT).”

It is unclear what convinced Sanaa and Riyadh to agree to a renewal of the truce at the last minute.

Spokesperson for the Secretary-General of the UN in New York, Stephane Dujarric, said on 1 June that the UN has seen “positive initial signals from the parties at this stage,” adding that Grundberg was engaged in “intense work to ensure the renewal of the truce.”

Before agreeing  to the extension, the Ansarallah resistance movement and the National Salvation Government (NSG) set the condition that the Saudi-backed administration pay the salaries of government employees in the areas under their control, as per the initial agreement.

Saudi-led coalition forces and the Aden parallel government have, in turn, demanded that Ansarallah lift its blockade of the southwestern Taiz region, an area of vital strategic importance that is also partly under siege by coalition forces.

According to a press release by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) released on 11 May, “the number of civilians killed and injured in Yemen has dropped by more than 50 percent since the start of the truce agreement,” while fuel deliveries have made their way through the main port of Hodeidah.

On 1 June, a Yemeni airliner holding dozens of passengers made its way from Sanaa airport to Cairo in the first commercial flight between Yemen and Egypt since 2016, as part of the truce agreement.

According to the Ansarallah resistance group, commercial flights from Sanaa were only allowed to Jordan and Egypt.

A Yemeni military official told Saba News Agency on 5 May that within the first month of the truce, the Saudi-led coalition had committed 5,365 violations of the agreement.

The official said the violations of the Saudi-led coalition included “offensive operations, infiltration attempts, air raids, flights of warplanes, Apache and spy planes, missile and artillery targets, and extensive targeting with bullets.”

In the face of the Saudi-led siege of the Arab world’s poorest country, Ansarallah has resorted to launching so-called ‘food missiles‘ into areas where people are in desperate need of help.

Saudi Arabia and its regional allies have been waging a brutal war on Yemen since 2015, leaving hundreds of thousands dead, millions displaced, and destroying the country’s infrastructure in what the UN describes as “one of the worst humanitarian crises of our time.”

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